CYBERSOCIETY 2.0 PDF

Forgot your login information? Edited by: Steven G. Subject: Mass Communication. Like its predecessor, the best-selling CyberSociety, published in , Cybersociety 2.

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Forgot your login information? Edited by: Steven G. Subject: Mass Communication. Like its predecessor, the best-selling CyberSociety, published in , Cybersociety 2. Both books are products of a particular moment in time, and serve as snapshots of the concerns and issues that surround the burgeoning new technologies of communication.

After a brief introduction to the history of computer-mediated communication, each essay in this volume highlights specific cyber societies and how computer-mediated communication affects the notion of self and its relation to community. Contributors probe issues of community, standards of conduct, communication, means of fixing identity, knowledge, information, and the exercise of Jones, S.

New Media Cultures: Cybersociety 2. Jones, Steven G. Cybersociety 2. New Media Cultures. Jones, S G ed. Jones, Steven G, ed. SAGE Knowledge.

Have you created a personal profile? Login or create a profile so that you can create alerts and save clips, playlists, and searches. Please log in from an authenticated institution or log into your member profile to access the email feature. New Media Cultures critically examines emerging social formations arising from and surrounding new technologies of communication. It focuses on the processes, products, and narratives that intersect with these technologies.

An emphasis of the series is on the Internet and computer-mediated communication, particularly as those technologies are implicated in the relationships among individuals, social groups, modern and postmodern ways of knowing, and public and private life.

Books in the series demonstrate interdisciplinary theoretical and methodological analyses, and highlight the relevance of intertwining history, theory, lived experience, and critical study to provide an understanding of new media and contemporary culture.

CyberSociety 2. View Copyright Page. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Computer networks—Social aspects. Computers and civilization. Jones, Steve, II. Title: CyberSociety two point zero IV. To paraphrase Ted Peterson's introduction to the revised edition of his book Magazines in the Twentieth Century , almost as soon as this book's predecessor, CyberSociety: Computer-Mediated Communication and Community , first appeared, netizens, software developers, hardware manufacturers, social scientists, social critics, and social activists set about making it out of date.

When CyberSociety was completed late in , the World Wide Web was something I clearly recall talking about with colleagues on-line. Web sites were few and far between, and content was, well, let's only say that it was by and large text with an occasional image thrown in for variety. And, also like its predecessor, CyberSociety 2. Such assistance can be found in a variety of sources available at most bookstores and libraries and even more readily available on-line. Some parts of those foundations still are present and visible in this book, and have been reengineered, whereas other parts of this book represent entirely new construction.

The goal was not to document the changes that have taken place since the first book's writing, just as the goal of this book is not to anticipate what changes will come our way.

Instead, the goal of this book, as of its predecessor, is to assist readers to become aware and critical of the hopes we have pinned on computer-mediated communication and of the cultures that are emerging among Internet users. Both books are products of a particular moment in time, and also thereby serve as snapshots of the state of affairs, the concerns and issues, surrounding these new technologies of communication. I am indebted to the authors whose work appears in these pages.

Their enthusiasm about the project and about computer-mediated communication not only constitutes this book but gives it life. They have patience, perseverance, faith, integrity, and diligence, and I will be forever grateful to them. I am also indebted to Margaret Seawell, my editor at Sage, with whom it is a joy to work, and who is thoughtful, caring, and helpful.

Frank Christel, general manager of KWGS-FM at the University of Tulsa remains a good friend and fellow cyberspace explorer who continues to alert me to new Internet-related developments, and whose insight and humor are priceless.

Emily Walker has been most supportive and helpful, and my colleagues in the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Chicago have given friendship, guidance, and [Page ix] intellectual sustenance.

The support of Sidney B. Simpson, Jr. I owe my colleague in the Faculty of Communication at the University of Tulsa, Joli Jensen, far more than words can convey. Her critiques of my work and the insights I gain from conversation with her are a high point of my academic life. I want to thank Jodi White, whose company I missed on many evenings and weekends while I worked on this book's predecessor, and who must have inwardly cringed when I broached the subject of working on another, but who showed patience, understanding, and pitched in to help me out.

Lastly, I wish to thank Ted Peterson, former Dean of the College of Communication at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, for his friendship, his teaching, his editing, the music he passed on to me, his handwritten letters, and the lucky penny. I miss him. Our concept of cyberspace, cyberculture, and cyber-everything is, more than we care to realize, a European idea, rooted in Deuteronomy, Socrates, Galileo, Jefferson, Edison, Jobs, Wozniak, glasnost, perestroika, and the United Federation of Planets.

Electronically distributed, almost instantaneous, communication has for many people supplanted the postal service, telephone, fax machine—in some cases it has supplanted face-to-face communication as well. There are now more than 30 million Internet host computers. Businesses continue to spring forth every day offering Internet access, consulting, design, countless services.

Nearly every sector of business has been touched by the Internet. And most any industry involved with delivering anything remotely electronic and in many cases nonelectronic—on-line grocery delivery services come to mind to the home, be it cable television, telephone, even electricity itself, has ventured into providing network services. To borrow from Lynn Canfield: Are we pulling close to these technologies, warming to them, or are they drawing nearer and nearer, inexorably encroaching on daily life?

In truth, such dualisms are never actual, and in the late s likely bespeak of millenialism. Accompanying these technological manifestations is an ongoing resurgence in prophecy related to computers and computing. Some portion of that prophecy relates to virtual reality VR technology, which promises all flavors of reality on demand but has yet to deliver it.

Some of it is associated with the combination of audio and video in the computer that is to lead us to the long-promised connection between the radio, television, computer, and to the combination of the Web and television, a match, one might say, made by those who make and sell couches.

James Carey has eloquently argued that prophecy has accompanied the arrival of most every new communication not to mention other technology.

Perhaps technology's numerous unfulfilled promises have led us to expect less bliss, but expectations for social change and community remain. Evidence of the expectations for social change can be found in the sublimity with which electronic mail and Internetworking are said to be of importance [Page xiii] to democracy.

As a press release touting the White House's e-mail connection claimed,. Today, we are pleased to announce that for the first time in history, the White House will be connected to you via electronic mail. Electronic mail will bring the Presidency and this Administration closer and make it more accessible to the people.

More important, these hopes lurk between the lines of that discourse, in the assumptions CMC users make about the connections they have to other users. To examine those assumptions is to understand fundamentally human needs for contact, control, knowledge, the social and sociological elements of communication, and community. Whereas it is true that the Internet overcomes distance, in some ways it also overcomes proximity We may eschew some forms of proximal communication chatting in the hallway at work, for instance for ones that distance us as we concentrate on the computer screen and not our environs , even as these technologies make distance seem meaningless.

Each essay in this volume provides another glimpse of how the promises of technology and the reality of its use mesh, collapse, and reorganize, and of the forms of cybersociety that are conjoined with that promise.

Cybersociety relies on, of course, the forms of CMC allowed by current computer network structures, and some discussion of those is in order. Excellent written introductions to electronic mail, the Internet, the World Wide Web, and a host of other computer networks, as well as software, are readily available, and I will not cover the ground they do. Each can readily assist with connection to the variety of computer links, experiences and activities described in CyberSociety 2.

Unlike many other analyses and studies of contemporary society, one may enter the communities and discourse described in these chapters with relative ease. The issues with which sociologists and anthropologists, among others, traditionally have engaged when conducting their research are part of that discourse, for it becomes necessary to cover ground concerning participant observation, privacy, and biography.

The best way to come in contact with those issues is to experience CMC. As background to the following chapters, though, some introduction to the history of computer-mediated communication is useful.

The connections in place for the most widely discussed computer network, the Internet, were formed in the s and early s when the U. Of course, one may draw deeper connections to older technologies, as do Carey , King, Grinter, and Pickering , and Marvin , for example. The resulting network, Arpanet, allowed for access to each site's computers not only for research but also for communication.

The former role took a back seat to the use of Arpanet as a means for researchers to share information by way of electronic messaging. Initially such messaging was in the form we are accustomed to from using the post office; individual messages are sent from one person to another. Nevertheless, it quickly became clear that messages often contained information to be shared by many users, and thus mailing lists were created. Bulletin boards, though, generally referred to computers one could reach by dialing through standard phone lines with a computer modem and linking with another computer.

Lengthy threads are created by individual messages that generate dozens, even hundreds, of replies. The largest manifestation of newsgroups is known as Usenet, a massive repository [Page xv] of thousands of newsgroups accessible from most any computer with a connection to the Internet.

In the s, the creation by Tim Berners-Lee of the World Wide Web, as a means of sharing visual, aural, and textual information, became the most visible, and most talked about, of the Internet's uses. The Internet essentially serves as the main connecting point for many other networks. It is a decentralized network, and its overall management now occurs via several not-for-profit governing organizations, though day-to-day management maintenance of network services, allocation of domain names and access, etc.

More important, no one group manages it. Instead, a variety of groups, such as the Internet Society and InterNIC, in concert with industry, circulate information, resolutions, and do research on the network's needs.

There are many purposes the Internet can serve, but the ones with which its users most frequently engage are text-based, even in the case of the World Wide Web. It could be argued, in fact, that the Internet is the latest expression of print-capitalism. Much as newspapers and pamphlets spread word of the New World to Europe, the Internet spreads word of electronic environments. Technologies continue to converge.

Virtual reality VR technology and even computer games like Nintendo's and Sega's, for example, provide still more arenas for communication and interaction.

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Cybersociety 2.0: Revisiting Computer-Mediated Communication and Community

To paraphrase Ted Peterson's introduction to the revised edition of his book Magazines in the Twentieth Century , almost as soon as this book's predecessor, CyberSociety: Computer Mediated Communication and Community , first appeared, netizens, software developers, hardware manufacturers, social scientists, social critics, and social activists set about making it out of date. When CyberSociety was completed late in the WorldWideWeb was something I clearly recall talking about with colleagues online. Web sites were few and far between, and content was, well, let's only say that it was by and large text with an occasional image thrown in for variety. As I had expected at that time, though, innovations in CMC, and communication via computers generally, exponentially increased to the point where electronic mail is as common in most countries as a phone call, or, as Adrianne Laird, then one of my undergraduate students, put it, even virtual reality was "just around the corner from commonplace. CyberSociety 2.

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