ANTIGONE BY SOPHOCLES TRANSLATED BY ROBERT FAGLES PDF

Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? Towering over the rest of Greek tragedy, Sophocles' The Three Theban Plays are among the most enduring and timeless dramas ever written. Collected here are Antigone, Oedipus the King and Oedipus at Colonus, in a translation by Robert Fagles which retains all of Sophocles' lucidity and power: the cut and thrust of his dialogue, his ironic edge, the surge and majesty of his choruses and, above all, the agonies and triumphs of his characters. Oedipus in exile, searching for his identity, desperately trying to avoid his fate, seeking the truth of his origins and achieving immortality; his daughter, Antigone, defending her integrity and ideals to the death - these heroic, tragic figures have captivated theatregoers and readers since the fifth century BC. It is Sophocles' characterisation of Oedipus that would, in the nineteenth century, inspire Sigmund Freud to a revolutionary conception of the human mind, and the tragedies in this volume continue to move and inspire us to this day.

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Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? Towering over the rest of Greek tragedy, Sophocles' The Three Theban Plays are among the most enduring and timeless dramas ever written. Collected here are Antigone, Oedipus the King and Oedipus at Colonus, in a translation by Robert Fagles which retains all of Sophocles' lucidity and power: the cut and thrust of his dialogue, his ironic edge, the surge and majesty of his choruses and, above all, the agonies and triumphs of his characters.

Oedipus in exile, searching for his identity, desperately trying to avoid his fate, seeking the truth of his origins and achieving immortality; his daughter, Antigone, defending her integrity and ideals to the death - these heroic, tragic figures have captivated theatregoers and readers since the fifth century BC.

It is Sophocles' characterisation of Oedipus that would, in the nineteenth century, inspire Sigmund Freud to a revolutionary conception of the human mind, and the tragedies in this volume continue to move and inspire us to this day. Sophocles BC was born at Colonus, just outside Athens. His long life spanned the rise and decline of the Athenian Empire; he was a friend of Pericles, and though not an active politician he held several public offices, both military and civil.

The leader of a literary circle and friend of Herodotus, Sophocles wrote over a hundred plays, drawing on a wide and varied range of themes, and winning the City Dionysia eighteen times; though only seven of his tragedies have survived, among them Antigone, Oedipus Rex, Ajax and Oedipus at Colonus.

Read more Read less. Frequently bought together. Add all three to Cart. One of these items is shipped sooner than the other. Show details. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Previous page. Medea and Other Plays. The Bacchae and Other Plays. The Odyssey. Oedipus the King. Mass Market Paperback. Next page. Sophocles was born in BC.

His long life spanned the rise and decline of the Athenian Empire. He wrote over a hundred plays, many of which are published as Penguin Classics, drawing on a wide and varied range of themes. Watling translated a range of Greek and Roman plays for Penguin, including the seven plays of Sophocles and the tragedies of Seneca.

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Review this product Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon. Verified Purchase. Through the sad tales of cursed families, they illustrate the evolution of Western civilization.

Fifth-century Athens was a light in the dark, a young democracy, and the Athenians used tragedy as a tool to preserve history, learn from it, and document their growth. Though heady, the plays also had an entertainment value. The Spring festival celebrating Dionysus provided an opportunity for playwrights such as Sophocles to compete and put on a performance for thousands of spectators. Tragedies usually ran in the morning and the more lighthearted comedies toward the end of the day.

Being tragedies, lighthearted these three Theban plays are not. The first play, Antigone, is actually the last chronologically. Oedipus is dead, yet the curse continues. Thebes has defeated an onslaught of Argosian warriors, led by Polynices, the exiled son of Oedipus. He was killed, along with his brother, Eteocles. Antigone, daughter of Oedipus and sister of both Polynices and Eteocles, wants to bury the body of Polynices, but her uncle and Theban King, Creon, threatens anyone who does so with death.

Each piece has its own beauty, but we move back in time to that dreadful moment of discovery. Oedipus represents the everyman, marching forward, thinking destiny is within his control, only to discover that he is a mere puppet to fate. Through plot twists and turns, Oedipus dedicates himself to finding the killer, only to discover that he is the killer, and that he has fulfilled a prophecy which he has tried to avoid all of his life.

The truth is too much. His wife and mother, Jocasta, kills herself, and Oedipus gouges out his eyes, his one act of defiant free will. Finally, we are presented with Oedipus at Colonus. Many years have passed and Oedipus has become a wanderer, guided by the loyal Antigone. He finds himself in the town of Colonus, just outside of Athens. The oracular prophecy makes its next move: Oedipus has arrived in the place where he must be buried.

This play is an ode to Athens, and by being buried just outside the city, it will be protected for all time. Thus ends the Theban trilogy. Similar to my Aeschylus readings, I picked up the Robert Fagles translation. This edition gives an introduction before each play. The plays dive into the themes of fate, guilt, civil disobedience and family ties, and other historical Greek motifs.

I enjoyed rereading these when I originally read them when I was in high school. Sophocles was 90 years old when he wrote this play. It is a about an old man confronting his own mortality, finishing what remains of his earthly life with courage and then virtually participating directly with the gods in preparing for both death and apotheosis. It is important to be aware of the religious ritual in this play.

Sophocles used the technical language of the Mystery religions; his very large audience would immediately sense Sophocles's secular use of religious elements. Or perhaps at his advanced age , so close to death himself, Sophocles was preparing for his death and sharing his objective, blessed, fearless approach with all of us. It's hard not to have such thoughts during a play which grows more serene, quiet, sincere, sacred in its last act.

I associate it with Beethoven's mystical late string quartets in its intimacy and intensity. The trappings of drama seem to fall away in those closing moments when the eponymous herald describes Oedipus's disappearance; he has been taken by the gods.

It's as if after suffering more grievously than any man at the hands of the gods, at the very end they stretch out those same hands and bring him into their divine community. And we are left here in the world to wonder at the mystery of things, which someday will inevitably be our mystery of departure.

These plays are part of the warp and woof of Western civilization. Two of them - "Oedipus the King" and "Antigone" - should be read by anyone who considers herself an educated citizen of the Western world.

And once she has read those two, why not go ahead and read the third, "Oedipus at Colonus"? Actually, one of the issues concerning the presentation, or reading, of these three plays is their order.

In terms of the chronology of the Oedipus story, "Oedipus the King" is the earliest, followed by "Oedipus at Colonus" and then, lastly, "Antigone" the events of which take place after the death of Oedipus. But Sophocles did not write the plays in that order.

Rather, he wrote "Antigone" first, around B. Those responsible for this edition chose to place them in the order in which they were written. The plays are popularly called the "Theban plays", because they all concern the city-state of Thebes during and after the reign of Oedipus. In them, Sophocles wrestles with some of the core concerns of human existence - especially, fate versus free will - in as dramatic and wrenching a fashion as any playwright, even Shakespeare.

In addition, "Antigone" poses questions concerning the limits if any of a citizen's obedience or subservience to the state. It also presents, compellingly, the question "whether a mere man can know the truth". And "Oedipus at Colonus" deals with matters of death and the possibility of influencing life after death. Fagles favors comprehension and flow over rigorous fidelity to the original ancient Greek. The text is sprinkled with modern English colloquialisms such as "rumor has it", "no napping on the job", and "far be it from me".

The result is a more accessible translation, one that certainly has much to commend it to those who are reading these classic plays for the first and in all likelihood only time in their lives. For myself, having refreshed my knowledge of the plays after having first read them about forty years ago, I want to read them yet again in a translation that is closer to the original Greek. What most distinguishes this particular Penguin Classics edition, even more so than the Fagles translation, are the four essays by Bernard Knox.

First, there is an eighteen-page essay on "Greece and the Theater", which provides an excellent, not-overly-academic introduction to Sophocles, the Oedipus story, and Greek drama generally. Then, for each of the specific plays, Knox contributes a separate twenty-plus page introduction. These are somewhat more detailed and remind me more of a college text. Go to Amazon. Back to top. Get to Know Us. Shopbop Designer Fashion Brands.

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The Three Theban Plays

It is very hard to know how to approach the Theban plays. They are, in a sense, incomprehensible, at least to me. They are in a dead language, which I do not know. So much is lost in that translation — the rhythms and rules of Greek poetry, even if they are followed by the translator, do not carry their import with them. And they are not prose, but plays, and I have not seen them staged, and something is lost in that. And so much also is lost without the context of their society — the meanings of things, the importance of things. And of course, Greek literature above all is dependent on its context — unlike most modern fiction, these tragedies were intended to be experienced by people who knew the plot and the characters and the details all in advance.

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Sophocles Translated by Robert Fagles

Towering over the rest of Greek tragedy, Sophocles' The Three Theban Plays are among the most enduring and timeless dramas ever written. Collected here are Antigone , Oedipus the King and Oedipus at Colonus , in a translation by Robert Fagles which retains all of Sophocles' lucidity and power: the cut and thrust of his dialogue, his ironic edge, the surge and majesty of his choruses and, above all, the agonies and triumphs of his characters. Oedipus in exile, searching for his identity, desperately trying to avoid his fate, seeking the truth of his origins and achieving immortality; his daughter, Antigone, defending her integrity and ideals to the death - these heroic, tragic figures have captivated theatregoers and readers since the fifth century BC. It is Sophocles' characterisation of Oedipus that would, in the nineteenth century, inspire Sigmund Freud to a revolutionary conception of the human mind, and the tragedies in this volume continue to move and inspire us to this day. Sophocles BC was born at Colonus, just outside Athens. His long life spanned the rise and decline of the Athenian Empire; he was a friend of Pericles, and though not an active politician he held several public offices, both military and civil. The leader of a literary circle and friend of Herodotus, Sophocles wrote over a hundred plays, drawing on a wide and varied range of themes, and winning the City Dionysia eighteen times; though only seven of his tragedies have survived, among them Antigone , Oedipus Rex, Ajax and Oedipus at Colonus.

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