GREENWASHING BRASIL PDF

Open Journal Systems. Ajuda do sistema. Tamanho de fonte. Thus, a theoretical framework on green marketing and greenwashing has been developed. The method adopted was a bibliometric research and a critical analysis associated with critical analysis of the content of the articles found, targeting the academic publications on the greenwashing term and other correlates, in the main Business Administration events in Brasil Semead, EnAnpad and EMA and on the most acknowledged scientific databases worldwide Proquest, Web of Science, Capes, Scopus, Scielo and Spell. Therefore, it has been possible to realize that the greenwashing subject, despite responding for a recent and relevant production, is still not very studied by the academy, especially in depth.

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Over the last 15 years, Bjarke Ingels has achieved something incredibly rare for contemporary architects, especially those under he has gained cultural momentum outside the discipline, even more so than two previous mega-starchitects, Zaha Hadid and Frank Gehry.

His ubiquity within the field is rivalled perhaps only by his former boss Rem Koolhaas, and ever since his firm BIG Bjarke Ingels Group moved from Copenhagen to NYC in they have been a part of some of the largest and most well funded urban interventions around the globe.

Instead, being sustainable should be thought of as a design challenge aimed at actually improving our environment and living conditions. Many BIG projects feature this radical architectural vision while maintaining an emphasis on economic viability. They can live exactly the way they want, or even better because the world and the city are designed in such a way that they can actually do so.

They embody a utopian spirit that says we can preserve our level of comfort and address the crisis of climate change at the same time through the power of innovative design.

This optimism is then synthesized with a business-friendly pragmatism that can attract high-end real estate developers as well as wealthy governments looking for investment. These projects represent some of the most ambitiously sustainable projects being built by high profile architects today, but in the era of global climate breakdown is this approach really enough?

Car of the Year FordPuma pic. The CopenHill waste-burning ski slope, featured in a recent car commercial for Ford, encapsulates in many ways the dynamic of well funded sustainable-minded architecture.

While a plant that incinerates waste to produce electricity is certainly a better option to the alternative methods of disposal, it is only a temporary solution that allows one to sidestep the larger and more difficult issue of industrial waste generation that is rapidly degrading the biosphere.

Attaching an expensive sports facility on top adds a secondary layer of distance from the serious scale of response required to address the climate crisis. The sustainable elements of these projects are an improvement, but the value is overwritten by their unwillingness to confront the deeper ecological issues of the architecture industry.

The truth is that behind the facade of high-minded architectural theories of utopia or pragmatism or even sustainability, a more powerful cultural force is at work, the same force that prompted the emphasis on sustainability in the first place. In recent years, the market for high-end urban residential buildings has soared, elevating the rate of development for luxury apartments to a thirty-year high. Huge skyscrapers sprouting out of urban centres around the world have devastating impacts on smaller local economies, attesting to the unquestionable might of billionaire real estate developers.

At the same time, the accelerating impacts of climate change have finally forced many architects and designers to confront the fact that piecemeal sustainable solutions like green roofs and solar panels do not constitute a serious response.

While they may seem only tangentially related, the immense injection of capital into luxury architectural projects and the crisis of climate change are in fact mutually stimulating dynamics.

Wealthy real estate developers who might otherwise be coerced into adopting more stringent waste reduction techniques or buying more ecologically resilient building materials are offered a more appealing option by firms like BIG who provide an appearance of greenness that does not conflict with the corporate ethos.

The community-destroying effect of gentrification and skyrocketing wealth inequality in urban areas has also been fueled by the march of new mega-scaled urban developments that architects have been more than happy to design and glorify in their media.

The material formation of the architectural process has to be reckoned with, and so far firms like BIG have not been leading the way. This assertion was in some way proven last week when it was reported that Ingels had met with far-right Brazillian president Jair Bolsonaro to discuss tourism and development opportunities in Brazil.

The reports of this meeting clearly shocked the architecture community more than Ingels expected. What could be the problem with a designer who appears to many as a leader in sustainable architecture meeting with one of the most globally powerful climate deniers in the world?

Bolsonaro has been accurately described as an arsonist for his role in aiding the destruction and blind monetization of the Amazon rainforest, as well as his open hatred and calls to violence against the indigenous communities who live there. His fascist leanings and open disdain for the activists who protest his agenda of deforestation have made him a universal enemy of the climate movement, who are rightly pissed off that an architect claiming to represent a green agenda would collaborate with him.

It also sends a clear message to governments and corporations around the globe that no matter how blatantly anti-ecological your reputation may be, there are still well regarded international design firms willing to aid in your greenwashing campaign. But I suppose Bolsonaro pays too well. Ingels is far from the first starchitect to reveal his insularity by walking into controversy; Rem Koolhas was famously courted by Bashar al-Assad to design museums in Syria, and Zaha Hadid guffawed at the notion that she should bear some responsibility in the deaths of construction workers building her world cup stadium in Qatar.

The defense of these infractions is always to say that if these designers did not take these projects, someone else would. However, the hidden choice that somehow never gets discussed always remains: to simply refuse money of brutal regimes and destructive corporations that ask for your services.

What has become clear is that if architects really want to shift their industry into a more ecologically focused direction, firms like BIG should not be their role models. In the era of climate change it might finally be time for starchitects to step aside, and let the discipline focus instead on re-orienting the power dynamic of their incredibly impactful industry. This means moving away from glorifying projects which are funded by billionaire developers, whether those projects claim to be sustainable or not.

Instead, we should celebrate those who use design as a tool to empower people at a local level to change their environments and become self-sufficient.

The starchitect class has been fatally captured by the interests of high powered finance and industry that got humanity embroiled in the crisis of climate change in the first place. They are, therefore, our opponents in the struggle for a more just and resilient future. Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Bjarke Ingels centre and Jair Bolsonaro second from left. Marcos Correa. Alexander Hadley. Alexander Hadley is a writer and architect based in Barcelona, Spain.

Since graduating from Temple University in , he has worked for architecture and landscape architecture firms and is currently studying ecological buildings and agro-forestry at Valldaura Labs. His writing revolves around issues of sustainability in architecture and the market forces that undergird them. A vey well crafted piece dear Alexander, solidly built and consistently offensive You could relate it to Trevor Boddy's critics of developocracy.

In other words: glass is a nice material, but when its overuse call the need for AC to cool the overheating it created: is it still affordable today? To celebrate those who actually do something useful, we have to reconsider our "stars". There should be much more press about the Global Award for Sustainable Architecture, for example. Some of the laureates are real heroes in our profession. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Support Failed Architecture's quality content and independent voice donate.

BURSZTA WOJCIECH ANTROPOLOGIA KULTURY PDF

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Greenwashing is rife in Brazil , where consumer goods companies are making more green claims than ever, according to a new study from Market Analysis, a Brazilian research firm. The study — which follows a similar report conducted in — analyzed more than 2, products across six different categories including cleaning, cosmetics and electronics. In , about products made green claims. Five years later, that number has jumped to more than 2, However, the number of green claims per product has decreased, from 1. Brazilian companies are spending more on social and environmental initiatives than most other countries, including the UK and Canada.

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Sustainability or Greenwashing?

Unnatural demand: The candeia tree of Brazil is a key source for an anti-inflammatory ingredient in cosmetics for sensitive skin, top; big demand threatened the rainforest and prompted some companies to rely on suppliers who guarantee sustainable origins. Symrise, a German publicly traded multinational company and leader in the flavor and fragrance industry, announced that it will no longer offer the product known as natural Alpha-Bisabolol, extracted from the wood of the candeia, a native tree of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Environmentalists, though, are not breaking out champagne as the Symrise decision exposes the harm that multinational corporations have inflicted on the rainforest. For more than 30 years, the Alpha-Bisabolol of candeia, or natural Bisabolol, was exported without fanfare. Only sporadic reports of clandestine sales and logging hinted at its value for the active ingredient — an anti-inflammatory used in cosmetics for sensitive skin. Candeia is a tropical cousin of chamomile, and both species are a source of oil used in the health-care industry. Purified candeia oil, however, contains 95 percent Bisabolol, while at most chamomile oil reaches 45 percent.

ALLELUIA VERBUM PANIS SPARTITO PDF

Brazil's big greenwash boom

Over the last 15 years, Bjarke Ingels has achieved something incredibly rare for contemporary architects, especially those under he has gained cultural momentum outside the discipline, even more so than two previous mega-starchitects, Zaha Hadid and Frank Gehry. His ubiquity within the field is rivalled perhaps only by his former boss Rem Koolhaas, and ever since his firm BIG Bjarke Ingels Group moved from Copenhagen to NYC in they have been a part of some of the largest and most well funded urban interventions around the globe. Instead, being sustainable should be thought of as a design challenge aimed at actually improving our environment and living conditions. Many BIG projects feature this radical architectural vision while maintaining an emphasis on economic viability. They can live exactly the way they want, or even better because the world and the city are designed in such a way that they can actually do so. They embody a utopian spirit that says we can preserve our level of comfort and address the crisis of climate change at the same time through the power of innovative design.

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